Bi's Of Colour
Great things for Bi Visibility Week!

It is #bivisibilty week this week! Things have been happening all over the world to celebrate it. There have also been a slew of articles appearing this week on bisexuality, many of which feature bisexuals of colour.

I’ve picked put some the faves..

Bi visibility site http://www.239.bicommunitynews.co.uk/year2014/

Bisexuals in academia
http://awareofawareness.com/2013/12/26/on-being-openly-bisexual-in-academia/

Understanding issues facing bi Americans http://www.lgbtmap.org/understanding-issues-facing-bisexual-Americans

The book, Recognize: Voices of Bi Men was released on BiVisibilty day! http://biresource.net/recognize_bimensbook.shtml

A new film called Bi-ography, from Bi Us TV were good enough to share their teaser trailer http://youtu.be/z9-SHYoCaSM

A chance to share your experiences with the Bi Story Project http://www.bistoryproject.org/submit-your-video.html

It’s time to stop mocking bisexuals! http://www.starobserver.com.au/opinion/soapbox-opinion/its-time-to-stop-mocking-bisexuals-and-end-biphobia/128193

BiCon 2014 was a great event. There were lots of bis of colour present, many of whom said that they enjoyed themselves and would come again.

In the Bis of Colour session, we heard feedback from what the members had been up to during the year. Asha had delivered a report during BiRecon, an academic bisexual event that preceded BiCon itself. Another member told of how she had set up Bifile I Norge (https://www.facebook.com/groups/bifileinorge/) Norway’s first ever Bisexual group! Yet another member told of how she had been interviewed by Empathize This! (http://empathizethis.com) And would have her experience of being bi at Pride told in a cartoon strip.

The group also discussed the case of Orashia, a bisexual man who is threatened with deportation, as the judge didn’t believe he was bi. Bis of Colour fully support this case. Please sign the petition and donate if you can to his legal costs. (http://leedsnoborders.wordpress.com/)

Unfortunately, we also heard reports of racism within BiCon. Despite the progress being made at this event, it is always depressing to hear that white attendees behave in ways that are disrespectful and harmful towards bisexuals of colour. We all should be able to enjoy BiCon without fear. We hope that one day, this will truly be the case.

London LGBT Pride was a wet but happy day. There were fewer visible bis of colour, but lots of people of colour throughout the parade, which was great to see. It was also good to see the positive religious groups like Imaan for LGBT Muslims, the gay Sikh group, and the various Christian LGBT groups. Religion, sexual orientation and ethnicity don’t have to cancel each other out!

Unfortunately, there were a couple of hateful comments from fellow marchers that did put a sour note on the day. It’s a real shame when a LGBT event includes having (mostly white gay men) shout “Breeders!” & “Switcheroos! at the bisexuals. Seems that some folks have forgotten that the B in LGBT isn’t silent. Bisexuals are part of the LGBT communities. It was great to march with them, and show the world that we belong!

Jamaica’s underground LGBT


Image from channel 4

Unreported World. May 2014.
(TW: mentions of abuse & homophobia/biphobia/transphobia)
(link to video - http://www.channel4.com/programmes/unreported-world/videos/all/jamaicas-underground-gays but it may not be viewable outside the U.K)

I don’t watch a lot of television. I find a lot of it frustrating and boring because it never reflects anyone remotely like me: black, fat and queer. But I tuned in to see the Unreported World’s short documentary on queer folks living in Jamaica. I lasted about five minutes before I had to switch off and have a cry.

The documentary was very moving; in one scene LGBT people had rocks thrown at them by crowds. When the police showed up, they said the LGBT folks were throwing stones at the crowd, completely reversing the truth. The next scene showed a government official telling a few queer folks that they can’t come to Jamaica and dress the way they did: “You’re not foreigners.” The last scene I watched after I tuned back in, showed a young person crying, saying that when he couldn’t bear any more, God would send an angel to him. I started crying again at that point.

I know that bigotry, homo/trans/biphobia exists all over the world. Jamaica isn’t the only place where queer people of colour live in fear. My home in England has laws to prevent discrimination, but I am still subject to physical, sexual and verbal threats and abuse on a regular basis because I’m black and bisexual. But what affected me so much about the programme, was that the hateful things that were done, were done to people who looked just like me. The nasty slurs were said with a Jamaican accent - the same accent I grew up with and was expected to emulate, even though I had never been to Jamaica. One particular slur, “b*tty boy” is something that still makes me scared because it was used often by the people around me growing up.

I’m glad the documentary aired, but I wish I’d been better prepared for how deeply it affected me. I was upset for the rest of the evening; I had flashbacks of the abusive people I grew up with, and all the horrible things they said and did. My heart went out to the LGBT folks who had to live in a sewer drain just to stay safe. After I was done crying, I remembered J-Flag (http://jflag.org) who support LGBTI people in Jamaica.

I know that I am fortunate that I can live as an openly out and proud black bisexual. I hope that one day, those in the documentary can do the same, and live in safety and freedom.

Wonderful photos of LGBT Muslim people.

BiCon2014
From the BiCon website:
BiCon is a weekend-long gathering for bisexual people, their friends, partners and others with a supportive interest in bisexuality. We don’t all use the labels “bi” or “bisexual” or even agree on what it means to be bi, but bisexuality is the common theme. A typical BiCon might have 250 participants, of which about 60 are at BiCon for the first time.
BiCon usually uses a university venue, not because it’s an academic event but because it’s cheap, welcoming and generally more accessible than other venues. You won’t find a flat screen TV in your bedroom, but you’ll be able to make your own meals (or order your own take-out!).

From a Bi of Colour:
We have had sessions at BiCon every year since 2010.  In 2012 we had a Bi’s of Colour flat just for us!  I would encourage anyone bi or bi-friendly to come along to BiCon 2014.  It’s a blast!

BiCon2014

From the BiCon website:

BiCon is a weekend-long gathering for bisexual people, their friends, partners and others with a supportive interest in bisexuality. We don’t all use the labels “bi” or “bisexual” or even agree on what it means to be bi, but bisexuality is the common theme. A typical BiCon might have 250 participants, of which about 60 are at BiCon for the first time.

BiCon usually uses a university venue, not because it’s an academic event but because it’s cheap, welcoming and generally more accessible than other venues. You won’t find a flat screen TV in your bedroom, but you’ll be able to make your own meals (or order your own take-out!).

From a Bi of Colour:

We have had sessions at BiCon every year since 2010.  In 2012 we had a Bi’s of Colour flat just for us!  I would encourage anyone bi or bi-friendly to come along to BiCon 2014.  It’s a blast!

Links from a brilliant Bi Visibility Day!
Below are all the articles I read over on Twitter for  Bi Visibility Day.  As always, do not read the comments unless you like being so upset and angry that your head explodes.
Bi Men in Ordinary Time
Being bisexual and dating a trans* person
Why we need a bi pride day
Being bisexual from T is for TMI
Why does bisexuality need celebrating?
Bisexual and Visible
A message from London Friend
Bisexual Adventures with Stavvers
Biphobia Bingo!
An Anthem for Bisexuals by yours truly
Even more articles on the amazing Bi Index!
UNISON's Black LGBT member's meeting will be on Friday 13th September 2013.  It starts at 11:00 and ends at 16:00.  There will be a free lunch included!  Registration is required.

I’ve always found these Network Meetings to be really useful.  I’ve helped to draft motions to the LGBT conference at one, and watched a great video about Bayard Rustin at another.

UNISON's Black LGBT member's meeting will be on Friday 13th September 2013.  It starts at 11:00 and ends at 16:00.  There will be a free lunch included!  Registration is required.

I’ve always found these Network Meetings to be really useful.  I’ve helped to draft motions to the LGBT conference at one, and watched a great video about Bayard Rustin at another.